Category Archives: Children and Domestic Violence

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- Human Trafficking=Modern Day Slavery 06/22 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- Human Trafficking=Modern Day Slavery 06/22 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

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Human Trafficking

Trafficking in persons is a serious crime and a grave violation of human rights. Every year, thousands of men, women, and children fall into the hands of traffickers, in their own countries and abroad. Almost every country in the world is affected by trafficking, whether as a country of origin, transit or destination for victims. UNODC, as guardian of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC) and the Protocols thereto, assists States in their efforts to implement the  Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons (Trafficking in Persons Protocol). http://www.unodc.org

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SAWUBONA- Women of Courage, Los Angeles June 23, 2018

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A unique art experience bringing healing, awareness, and transformation to those who have been victims of emotional, sexual, and physical trauma – so they can step into the powerful women they truly are and THRIVE.

I AM YOU. YOU ARE ME. I SEE YOU.

Sawubona, meaning, “I see you” in Zulu, is a live performance exercise that will bring 10 young women and 10 powerful leaders in Los Angeles toe-to-toe and face-to-face in a guided silent exercise allowing them to see each other. These women have been through difficult situations in life, but are able to show each other than what they have been through does not define them, that a life of thriving is possible, and that they are as powerful as they choose to be.

The event will also give attendees, men, and women, an opportunity to step into their truth and power and discover that I am you and you are me as they participate in an interactive art experience with artwork, photographs, art installations, and film.

Come to join us for an evening you are likely to never forget.

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Adopted illegally as a baby and treated like “Cinderella”, Amy left home at 15 to forge a life of her own – without the legal paperwork to do so.
“She generally was emotionally and physically abusive. From the moment I can remember, she was throwing at me like, ‘Oh, I saved your life. You were riddled with disease. You were going to die. You were from a super poor orphanage. You owe me for the roof over your head, the clothes I give you.’ So, she always threw that at me and I think adoption is such as a beautiful, beautiful thing. And, she kind of turned it into a very ugly, ugly thing.”
A M Y
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Thank you for being a part of Sawubona, Women of Courage! 

We would love to know more about you to share with our audience to help inspire and empower other women. Please answer any or all of the following questions:

Please answer in complete sentences:

What opened up for you as a result of the guided visualization?

I saw a window of opportunity which showed me the things I deeply desire to accomplish in my life. The things which are hidden deep inside myself manifested as pictures, and it gave me courage to go what I deeply feel is mine. Something I have been thinking about and seeing, but I always have been waiting for the right moment to arrive. Suddenly, I felt so confident and happy at the same time.

What has been the biggest hurdle you have had to overcome to get where you are today?

My life has always been about overcoming obstacles and dealing with things which are not me. I had to become strong warrior and believer that anything is possible with persistence and clear vision of what I want to accomplish in my life. The war inside me was my biggest obstacle I had to deal with before I was able to get where I am today. 

What does it mean for you to be a woman of courage?

Woman of courage is the one who never gives up on her dreams and hopes no matter how difficult life can be. The kind of woman who is strong and powerful and nothing can stands on her way. 

What would you tell your younger self in one of your lowest times knowing what you know now?

Dear Dianna, please love yourself and never compromise yourself and put yourself second and do the things which makes you. Do not allow anyone to tell you otherwise, you know what is best for you.

Do you have anything else you would like to share about your experience to help other women find their strength to thrive in life?

Always listen to your inner voice in every situation, this is your best friend. Find time for yourself, do the things which makes you and love yourself.  

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- Child Abuse and Neglect 04/13 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- Child Abuse and Neglect 04/13 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

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A complete list of child abuse statistics in the united states. The most astonishing stat is annually over 3 million children are victims of child abuse. Child Help.org

Happy Women’s International Day

Ashes and Ice cover

Ashes and Ice is available to download for Only $0.99 on Amazon until March 10,2018

Download HERE

Please leave your comments on Amazon and share with your friends and family.

 

 

 

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- Recognize the Signs of Teen Abuse 02/23 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- Recognize the Signs of Teen Abuse 02/23 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

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 Award Winning Book “Fire and Ice” 
by Diana Bellerose
Link: https://www.buybooksontheweb.com/product.aspx?ISBN=0-7414-7035-7

When it comes to teen sexual abuse, the problem is more common than one might think. While not considered terribly common, the problem is not considered uncommon. And, because less than half of sexual abuse is reported, it could be more prevalent than most people are willing to admit. Therefore, it is important to carefully consider teen sexual abuse, and how to stop it. One way is education. It is important for teens and adults to understand that sexual abuse of teenagers is wrong, and that it can encompass a variety of sex acts, and that fear, impaired judgment (due to drugs, alcohol or mental state) and coercion can lead to sexual abuse, even though the victim may not actively resist. A victim whose compliance is due to factors other than a desire to engage in sexual activity has not actually consented. Source TeenHelp.com

What might be the reason for the mass shooting in Florida? Interview with Anti-Abuse Advocate Mandy Trouten

by Dianna Bellerose

 

 

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  1. What is your point of view on gun violence and gun laws?

I doubt any reasonable person would question that it’s wrong. The only good purpose for a gun is if you are defending yourself from a physical threat that you can’t reasonably resolve without a weapon; e.g. assault, threatened assault, or threatened murder, by someone who is bigger, stronger, holding/reaching for a weapon, and/or who exerts a sufficient enough power over you that you feel helpless to stop him/her otherwise, as is the case in many instances of abuse.
Within the boundaries of self-defense, I support having guns in schools. However, I believe those guns should only be in the hands of trained and approved individuals; e.g. teachers, administrators, and SROs who have passed background checks and don’t have any red flags against them. In an ideal world, I might also include responsible, mentally-balanced teens; but, in an ideal world, all of this would be moot because we wouldn’t have school shootings. Likewise, I support the notion of improved background checks; but, I believe that’s the limit to how effective gun laws can be.
The reason goes back to what motivates the shooter in any scenario. The problem of gun violence, in schools or anywhere else, doesn’t begin with guns. A gun, locked and in its holster, doesn’t fire itself. It takes a person, and that person has to have a motive. This motive may be self-defense/defense of someone else, desperation in the face of poverty, or participation in a gang. Then, there are those who use a gun for no other reason than because they want to. It’s a preferred and elevating part of exerting control over someone else. It serves the purpose of making the person less likely to fight back unless s/he also has a gun, in which case the first person is that much less likely to attack the second person to begin with. Then, of course, there is the matter of mental illness; there are those who should not pass a background check because they lack the capacity to fully establish and express when it is/isn’t appropriate to use a gun, or because they are otherwise violent to such a degree that a reasonable person would hesitate to give him/her a gun.
Take a stalker, for instance. S/he may be able to tell you the right answers; but, when it comes down to it, s/he has a higher likelihood of shooting his/her victim, to then rationalize that it was deserved, often for a completely irrational reason. Taking all of this into account, there is the concern of what eliminating guns would actually accomplish. “The majority of murders throughout the Americas are committed with guns…Gun restriction proponents point to the case in Brazil, where gun access was restricted and the murder rate dropped. Proponents of gun ownership point to the case in Venezuela, where gun access was denied, guns were taken away, and the murder rate increased.” 4 In two countries, access to guns is restricted/denied. In one, murder goes up. In the other, murder goes down. Therefore, the solution must be based on something other than the availability of guns, which is why we must look at other societal factors, i.e. motives.

 

2. What do you think triggered Nikolas Cruz’s rage? Do you feel that his pain has been accumulating for years because of constant bullying?

 

I don’t think it was triggered, in a recent sense, so much as that it’s been building since as early as a 3rd-4th grade. In 4th grade, he was killing and physically abusing small animals. Just about everyone in the area allegedly had issues with him–issues that included theft, harassment, vandalism, and peeping into bedroom windows. 1 There were at least 36 calls to 911 in 6 years–an average of 1 every other month, though, realistically, it was probably more than once per month, with quiet periods while he was getting psychological help. Yet, he was never arrested and was cleared as being “no threat to anyone or himself.” 2 Let that soak in for a moment–this young man had been abusing/killing small animals, had become a menace to his neighborhood, and had been involved in 36 calls to 911. Yet, he was deemed to not be a threat–and this is just the tip of the iceberg.
He was very clearly mentally ill. He had a history of violence/abuse. He was even suspended multiple times, then expelled from this same high school. ‘His therapist and the deputies on scene concluded that there were “no signs of mental illness or criminal activity.”‘ 2 Yet, at that time, he had been cutting his own arms, allegedly to get attention, and had mentioned wanting to buy a firearm. You don’t self-mutilate unless you’re suffering from a mental illness. Usually, that illness is depression, which he was believed to have had. He is also believed to have had brain development issues and trouble with impulse control. 5 The risk he posed was so well-known that other students “jokingly” referred to him as “the one who would shoot up the school.” 3 Meanwhile, the school had already disallowed him from having a backpack on campus due to the belief that he might bring a weapon to school.
I believe bullying was part of it. It certainly didn’t help. However, whether it was constant isn’t something that has yet been established. What has been established is that “often complained about bullying on campus.”

 

3. Why is it so important for families and school officials to pay closer attention to students, namely those who are being bullied and others who show signs of related mental illnesses?

There are many reasons–all of which boil down to the right of all students to a safe and equal education and the right of employees to a safe work environment. However, for the purposes of this interview, I’ll limit my response to school shootings. In approximately 3/4 of school shootings, the shooter was a victim of peer abuse. The remaining 1/4 of cases may also have involved abuse; but, it’s unrecognized and, thus, isn’t certain. However, in all cases, mental illness is involved. It may/may not have been a pre-existing condition; but, I believe it’s reasonable to say that a sufficiently high enough degree of mental illness had developed by the time of the shooting to keep the person from thinking as clearly as you and I are right now.
Peer abuse is a matter of life and death. In addition to the high percentage of victims among school shooters, it increases the chances of committing suicide by 500%. Likewise, there is the increased likelihood of developing eating disorders, developing other minor/major health conditions, dropping out of school, committing lesser crimes, later on, inability to maintain relationships after being abused, etc. However, it must also be acknowledged that peer abuse isn’t enough in itself to bring on a shooting. It must also involve a degree of mental illness. Sometimes, the person is born with that factor. Sometimes, it’s created, in large part, by the people in his/her life. Nikolas Cruz’ issues were noticed and acknowledged before the shooting. Yet, he was not stopped and, in fact, was mocked by other students, while, allegedly, his being bullied was ignored by teachers.
Jim Lewis, the family’s lawyer, was quoted as saying that the shooting “was the first indication they had of the depth of violence inside Nikolas Cruz.” This might be true for the family he was staying with at the time of the shooting; but, when he was younger, his mother knew. The neighbors and school knew/should have known. He didn’t come out of the blue–a straight-A student with no history of trouble–and bring a gun to school. Nikolas Cruz was deeply troubled and just about everyone knew it, and/or had sufficient reason that they should have known it.

4.  Do you think that if the school and others had been paying more attention to what is going on in his life this would have never happened? Is he the only person to be blamed for this tragic event?

Yes and no, respectively. However, it doesn’t appear to have been an issue of paying attention, so much as of taking it seriously. In and out of schools, I believe people have a long-standing habit of not taking teens seriously until one is holding a gun. Then, he’s “evil,” “psychotic,” “cowardly,” “the only one to blame,” etc. The district office was quoted as saying that they had received no warnings/threats of the shooting before it happened 5; yet, the evidence is clear that there were plenty of warnings/threats. He got suspended, further restricted, and then expelled. Then, he was transferred to another school in the county for unspecified issues that arose.7 For a while, he was receiving psychiatric treatment for those indicators–sessions which were paid for and arranged by his mother and which ended when she died this past November.6 It seems rather obvious that they were warned; but, they didn’t take it seriously, whether because he was a teenager or because they didn’t specifically receive a phone call, email, tacked-up flyer, etc., right before the shooting, saying what was was going to happen, where, and when. Undoubtedly, many will say I’m being unfair; but, I don’t know how many times a school has to hear that someone is a threat for them to believe it. Why do you have to hear the specific words “I’m going to bring a gun and kill as many people as possible, on Valentines Day at _____ time” to take the threat seriously?
To their credit, the school did expel him. However, I was under the apparently mistaken impression that you’re supposed to call the police and file a report when you expel someone for violence or threats of violence. Doing so would, I think, have gone on his criminal record, which would have kept him, at least, from purchasing the rifle legally. Between that and more mental health help along the way, this might have been avoided. Of course, I realize that it’s not a certainty, being a matter of severe mental illness; but, with his very long history of violence and mental illness, much more could/should have been done. Yet, people are saying that it came out of left field–that no one saw it coming. Whether in ignorance or intentionally, he was overlooked. Now, he’s in jail for 17 counts of murder and as many as 17 families will never see their loved ones again.
Sources

 

 

1. https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/fla-shooting-suspect-had-a-history-of-explosive-anger-depression-killing-animals/2018/02/15/06f05710-1291-11e8-9570-29c9830535e5_story.html?utm_term=.be07d603a95b
2. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/02/16/alleged-florida-school-shooter-nikolas-cruz-was-reported-to-fbi-cops-school-but-warning-signs-missed.html
3. https://www.buzzfeed.com/briannasacks/florida-school-shooting-suspect?utm_term=.rig11l7ND#.iqVEE9m2v
4. https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/murder-rates-by-country.html
5. http://time.com/5159134/who-is-the-florida-shooter-parkland-nicolas-cruz/
6. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/parkland-shooting-florida-stoneman-douglas-high-school-shooter-nikolas-cruz/
7. https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/14/us/nikolas-cruz-florida-shooting-suspect/index.html
8. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/15/us/florida-school-victims.html

Bio
Mandy Trouten has 13+ years of experience as an anti-abuse advocate on the subject of peer abuse in schools. She is also the author of two published books and a co-author on a school disciplinary procedure, centered on how to better address/end peer abuse.

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- I Never Thought I Would Be A Statistic 01/12 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

Empowering and Inspiring Women Globally- I Never Thought I Would Be A Statistic 01/12 by DiannaBelleRose | Entertainment Podcasts

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Bio

Joanne M. Cherisma is a Haitian born writer, a born-again Christian, a mother and a nurse, by profession.  She is also the author of I Never Thought I Would Be A Statistic in which she shared her testimony of how she overcame an abusive relationship.  

Her popular page, Beyond the Abuse, was created in order to bring awareness on an abusive relationship and provide hope, empowerment, support, and confidence to the victims. Joanne writes poetic prose that speaks to the hearts of many.  Her passion for writing embodies her empathetic nature while showcasing inner human vulnerability that sometimes goes unheard.  Joanne uses her writing as an outlet and voice for those who can understand the slings and arrows of life.  She has a realistic view of situations which allow her readers to go on journeys through her writing.  She lives in New York.

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I Never Thought I Would Be A Statistic